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Дурная слава / Infamous (2006)

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попробовала сделать фотки/скриншоты - не получилось :(
поэтому Betina все в твои руки)))

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Kire
ок, сделаю на днях  :)

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Review 'Infamous'

If the cogs of the movie-making machine are going to keep turning out the exact same movie, why do I have to write up a whole new review?

It's hard to keep an open mind when the synopsis – celebrated author Truman Capote heads to Kansas after a quadruple homicide rocks a rural town, where he becomes obsessed with one of the killers as he pens his book In Cold Blood – perfectly describes not only the new release Infamous, but last year's Capote just as well. To try to look at Infamous in a vacuum is disingenuous at best; no one who will see this movie has not at least heard of the other.

And unfortunately for Infamous, that means it's doomed to be Capote's forgotten sibling: This one is a year later, several Oscar nominations (and one win) shy, and nowhere near as good. On its own, it may not be so bad, but in the scheme of things, it's wholly redundant.

Writer-director Douglas McGrath's version of the story is based on the book Truman Capote: In Which Various Friends, Enemies, Acquaintances and Detractors Recall His Turbulent Career and as such features a variety of talking head interviews of his contemporaries -- Gore Vidal, Diana Vreeland, Babe Paley -- attempting to explain the character that was Truman Capote. The device works quite well, but is sadly only used for about 10 minutes or so (it pops up again at the end, but by then it has been downgraded to voice-over treacle).

Infamous starts out quite amusingly, painting a charmingly superficial picture of the high flying New York society scene of which Truman was queen bee. Toby Jones plays Truman as a swishy little troll, a preposterous muppet in human form, and he's entertaining as hell in the role. When Truman heads to Kansas to write about how the town is affected by the murders, it's a pure fish-out-of-water comedy. If it's not enough that Truman is five feet tall with a cartoon voice and an urban sensibility, he shows up with a trousseau and a full-length fur.

But from there on out, McGrath tells not only the exact same story, but in the exact same way as Capote: Truman slowly wins over the town, begins interviewing the two killers, and his obsession with one, Perry Smith (Daniel Craig), leads virtually to his own ruin. And it's not merely that we've seen these characters, this context, this story before; it's that Infamous lays them out in the most straightforward, uncomplicated and uninteresting manner. Perry opening up and talking about his past is not an unveiling, it's a flashback; Truman's obsession is shown, but never explained; all of the story's complexities are ironed out as pat as possible.

And sadly, the salvation is not to be found in the acting. Craig is entirely too…rugged for the part of Perry. His inescapable manliness might be good news to those worried about the fate of the Bond franchise, but it’s all wrong here. He displays none of the tenderness that supposedly draws Capote to him. And so much feels like stunt casting – Sandra Bullock as Harper Lee performs as though in a community theatre production of Our Town, and Gwyneth Paltrow has three very long minutes singing on screen as Peggy Lee in a pointless cameo.

It's not all bad – Jones won't get as much credit as Phillip Seymour Hoffman, but he's wonderful as Truman. Hope Davis and Sigourney Weaver are similarly entertaining as socialite swans (Weaver's casting, playing the wife of legendary CBS president William S. Paley, is a charming little in-joke, as Weaver is the real-life daughter of legendary NBC president Pat Weaver).

It's also, clearly, a great story. McGrath may have very much wanted to tell it, but he was beaten to the punch, which should have killed Infamous as extraneous. Because even if the story itself is very intriguing, go rent Capote. Or even better yet, read In Cold Blood. Nothing beats an original.

Источник

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London Film Critics' Circle Awards назвали Актера Года - это Тоби Джонс, за роль в фильме "Дурная слава".

увеличить

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Betina написал(а):

Тоби Джонс, за роль в фильме "Дурная слава".

Думаю заслуженно дали (не кидайте в меня тухлыми помидорами  :D ), он и правда очень хорошо сыграл свою роль в этом фильме.....мне даже захотелось сравнить с фильмом "Капоте" за роль главного героя в прошлом году Оскара дали

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шикарная обложка  :good:

http://photofile.ru/photo/daniel_craig/2397583/large/45063348.jpg

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Почти досмотрела этот фильм. Kire, спасибо огромное!

Приду в себя, переварю и попытаюсь нацарапать впечатления!

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Да, обязательно напиши! Я тут уже читала, что "Капоте" более ровный и лучше срежиссированный, зато "Дурная слава" выигрывает за счет мегаэмоциональной игры Дэниела и Тоби Джонса...

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Элен написал(а):

Приду в себя, переварю и попытаюсь нацарапать впечатления!

ооо, очень жду! а то я толком и не поняла, что за фильм. и хоть все-равно буду смотреть, интересно узнать впечатления.

Xev написал(а):

Я тут уже читала, что "Капоте" более ровный и лучше срежиссированный, зато "Дурная слава" выигрывает за счет мегаэмоциональной игры Дэниела и Тоби Джонса...

нисколько не сомневаюсь в игре Дэниэла  :D но вот о Капоте я, кажется, не слышала положительных отзывов....

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Betina написал(а):

но вот о Капоте я, кажется, не слышала положительных отзывов....

то есть как?  :blink: ведь Тоби Джонсу дали премию за эту роль, ты ж сама написала

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Kire написал(а):

ведь Тоби Джонсу дали премию за эту роль, ты ж сама написала

за "Дурную славу" ему дали, а есть еще фильм "Капоте", это совсем другая свадьба :)

вот ссылка - http://imdb.com/title/tt0379725/
хотя, рейтинг, я смотрю, нефиговый  :O

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Даже не знаю, как подступиться к  этому фильму… попробую.
Свингующая  Америка  1959 года. Нью-Йорк,  фешенебельные районы Парк-лейн и Пятой авеню. Модный писатель и журналист Трумэн Капоте ведет  жизнь сибарита, имеет  в высшем свете Нью-Йорка многочисленных почитательниц и занимается  в основном тем, что выслушивает и пересказывает  сплетни. Однажды утром, прочитав в газете о страшном преступлении в Канзасе, где  зверски были убиты местный фермер и его семья, он решает написать книгу  об этом и со своей подругой( единственной из его окружения, не принадлежащей к  высшему свету), отправляется в Канзас. Вот такая преамбула ,подробности посмотрите сами , а я продолжу, на мой взгляд, с самого интересного. А именно, со встречи этого тщедушного манерного человечка с одним из убийц по фамилии Смит.  Вот тут я следила за каждым словом и жестом этих двоих. Потрясающий дуэт!
Тоби Джонс ,играющий рафинированного, циничного гомосексуалиста-интеллектуала и наш Дэниел, грубый убийца  с грацией и повадками хищного зверя.  Эти их тюремные диалоги ,когда градус общения  накаляется от « холодно и враждебно» до « доверительно, очень дружески и почти любовно»! :good:   Выясняется, что оба на самом деле не такие, какими кажутся на первый взгляд. Сыграно так, что на определенном этапе начинаешь с одной стороны, привыкать, а потом и просто симпатизировать   маленькому писателю –гею(  сначала Тоби Джонс  никаких приятных эмоций у меня не вызывал), а с другой стороны, начинаешь  оправдывать убийцу, хотя оправданий у него  вообще-то нет.   С убийцей –то понятно, его же играет Крейг!. :)  Но магия их игры такова, что совершенно отстраненный зритель проникнется теми же чувствами.
Всё это надо конечно же видеть собственными глазами, любой пересказ  только нарушит  ту ткань, тот рисунок игры,  который создали эти двое.  Перескажу только один момент. В этом фильме Вильям , наш Шекспир,  не представлен во всеми любимом мокром виде  и это упущение  не давало покоя режиссеру, сценаристу и самому Крейгу. :)   Только этим я могу объяснить включение некоторых фраз в релаксирующий  монолог героя Тоби Джонса.
Итак, представьте себе мизансцену: тюремная камера, в углу  ,у стены стоит наш Дэниел  в джинсах и белой майке ( великолепные мускулы его плечевого пояса  описывать не буду, сами увидите :inlove: ). У него закрыты глаза, голова откинута назад, он пытается расслабиться. А рядом с ним стоит маленький плюгавенький человечек, который
жадно рассматривает всё это великолепие и шепчет следующий текст:

«Представьте себе что-то приятное и расслабьтесь. А теперь представьте себе воду, которая льется на вас, течет по вам, смывает с вас всё напряжение.. Ощутите жар и примите его. Ощутите своей щекой дуновение ветра. Вы ощущаете бриз- это дуновение рая, просто отдайтесь ему! Расслабьте каждую мышцу, весь организм!»

Они решили, что раз мы не  увидим здесь мокрого Крейга, то хотя бы должны себе нарисовать его, мокрого, в своем воображении! :heat:

Мне много хочется сказать о каждом их разговоре, о предсказуемой, но от этого не менее трагической, развязке, о пронзительном эпизоде с прощальным поцелуем в щеку( он мне показался гораздо более чувственным, чем их знаменитый поцелуй в губы), о паре куплетов, напетых Крейгом под гитару и, наконец, о самой атмосфере фильма. Но это займет так много времени и места, что я воздержусь. :)  В конце концов, когда все посмотрят этот фильм, мы очень  дружненько сможем поделиться впечатлениями  о  понравившихся сценах.
Да, забыла сказать, к темным волосам и карим глазам Крейга быстро привыкаешь. А в замкнутом пространстве маленькой камеры его тело и его движения смотрятся  ещё более выигрышно – полное ощущение запертого в клетку  прекрасного зверя .

Не касаюсь женских ролей ,создающих общую атмосферу времени и способе выстраивания повествования с помощью пояснительных монологов-интервью, хотя,тоже интересная тема.

Оценку фильму ставлю отличную, эмоций много,  в финале плакала. :good:

Отредактировано Элен (2007-02-21 04:27:23)

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Элен, как ты пишешь! Зачиталась! :good:  :g-r:

Жду докачки как на иголках!

Элен написал(а):

«Представьте себе что-то приятное и расслабьтесь. А теперь представьте себе воду, которая льется на вас, течет по вам, смывает с вас всё напряжение.. Ощутите жар и примите его. Ощутите своей щекой дуновение ветра. Вы ощущаете бриз- это дуновение рая, просто отдайтесь ему! Расслабьте каждую мышцу, весь организм!»
Они решили, что раз мы не  увидим здесь мокрого Крейга, то хотя бы должны себе нарисовать его, мокрого, в своем воображении!

Мне как-то резко поплохело http://danielcraig.2bb.ru/uploads/danielcraig/2_sm26.gif

Элен написал(а):

Итак, представьте себе мизансцену: тюремная камера, в углу  ,у стены, стоит наш Дэниел  в джинсах и белой майке ( великолепные мускулы его плечевого пояса  описывать не буду, сами увидите

Позвольте предложить иллюстрацию (правда, он тут лежит, а не стоит, но эффект думаю не меньший):
:swoon:

увеличить

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Xev, спасибо за комментарии!!! Хи-хи! Скорее докачивай,очень хочется  твой отзыв почитать! Тем более,что ты будешь слушать голоса в оригинале! Ощущения от Крейга должны усилиться!  Потому что голос,которым его озвучивали ему не подходил и это несколько портило картину!

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Посмотрела превьюшку, мне уже понравилось! Обожаю стилистику 50х, и Гвинет просто красавица, интересно, она сама поет? Ким Бесингер, помнится, сама пела в Привычке жениться.

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Xev написал(а):

Гвинет просто красавица

:beee:
Гвинет я не оч люблю как актрису и как визуальный образ

я не совсем поняла ее роль в этом фильме, и чего она разрыдалась...

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Kire написал(а):

я не совсем поняла ее роль в этом фильме

Думаю,она изображает какую-то, реально существовавшую, певицу тех лет, т. е. ,  относится к стилистике 50-х годов.. Ещё один штрих к портрету эпохи,так сказать :)

А я Гвинет очень полюбила ,как актрису, после Сильвии. Она сыграла мощно! Да и  внешне хороша!

Отредактировано Элен (2007-02-21 02:31:11)

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Элен написал(а):

после Сильвии. Она сыграла мощно!

хм, рядом с Крейгом, и не мощно....да и еще с Оскаром на полке....

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Kire написал(а):

хм, рядом с Крейгом, и не мощно....да и еще с Оскаром на полке

Хи-хи! Ну да, я как раз о том же! :)

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Xev написал(а):

Элен, как ты пишешь! Зачиталась!

подписываюсь! Элен, я так живо себе представила все, что ты описала... и Крэйга  :heat: ух! тоже уже жду-не дождусь, когда скачается фильм... а у меня еще такой простой с закачиванием...(( когда фильмы скачаны и в папочке лежат, пусть и несмотренные, как-то легче становится  :D

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Betina написал(а):

тоже уже жду-не дождусь, когда скачается фильм

Спасибо, Betina! Ничего- всё равно скачается,это же у тебя временные проблемы!  Вы с Xev счастливицы - можете скачивать!  Фильмы у вас в папочке лежат!  А мне по интернет-магазинам приходиться рыскать! :)  Вот ,дней через пять   "Уцелевшую любовь"  пришлют и я тоже включусь в обсуждение.  :)

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Элен написал(а):

А мне по интернет-магазинам приходиться рыскать

а на каком ты нашла? :O

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Kire написал(а):

а на каком ты нашла

А ты посмотри тему про этот фильм,там кто-то из дам ссылку давал на питерский интернет-магазин. Вот я и воспользовалась.

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Interview with Daniel Craig from "Infamous"
From Rebecca Murray,

At the 2007 Film Independent's Spirit Awards

Daniel Craig, the new Bond, James Bond, cut his acting teeth in the independent film world and is proud of the work he's done in that arena. Casino Royale may have catapulted him into a whole new stratosphere of recognition and fame, but it was his role in the second Truman Capote film, Infamous, that garnered him a 2007 Film Independent's Spirit Awards nomination for Best Supporting Male.

At the Spirit Awards in support of Infamous, Daniel Craig chatted briefly about that film while on the 'blue' carpet set up on a beach in Santa Monica.

Why is it important for you to continue to do independent films in addition to big feature films like Casino Royale?
“I mean, for me it’s crucially important. It’s kind of like it’s where you get… Independent movies are what shore up the film industry. It’s where people get their experience as well. It’s what I’ve done; it’s what I’ve been doing for all of my career. It’s where I learned my trade."

Why are the Spirit Awards so important?
“It’s good to have a celebration day. I mean, it really is. It’s important because everybody works so hard and usually for very little money, so it’s good to have a day where we kind of recognize it.”

Does being Bond help sell Infamous?
“I don’t know. I hope so (laughing).”

What did it mean to be nominated for Best Supporting Male?
“It means a tremendous amount to me. I’m very proud of the movie we did and hopefully we can share it about a bit with everybody who was involved in it.”

What’s the most rewarding thing about being involved in an independent film rather than a big action movie?
“I don’t know. I like working so I don’t really make that comparison. You do have more freedom in movies like that because there are less constraints. You can tackle difficult subjects and that, I think, is important.”

What did you think about the fact two Truman Capote films were made at around the same time?
"We made, I think, a very beautiful movie. We made them at the same time and they both turned out. [This award recognition] is very important for everybody involved."

Источник

Отредактировано Xev (2007-03-02 20:59:16)

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Toby Jones and Douglas McGrath Discuss "Infamous"

From Rebecca Murray,

Jones and McGrath Talk About Their Truman Capote Film

It may not have been the first Truman Capote film out of the gate but Infamous is just as entertaining as last year's awards season darling - Capote. Written and directed by Douglas McGrath, this Capote film features a stellar performance by Toby Jones as the man with the voice which, according to Gore Vidal, sounds like a Brussels sprout if a Brussells sprout could talk. The story follows Capote's journey to Kansas to research the book that would prove to be the final book of his career, In Cold Blood.
Douglas McGrath Explains the Origin of His Fascination with Truman Capote: McGrath says it all sprang from watching Capote on The Dick Cavett Show. “I will tell you the thing that brought me to it is my first year out of college I worked at Saturday Night Live. I used to get home quite late and not that the show was funny the year that I worked there, but I didn’t feel like watching comedy on TV at that hour so I often watched Dick Cavett, which was amusing but I wouldn’t call it comedy. Truman was a guest one night and I’d never seen him before. Dick Cavett introduced him as a ‘master stylist’ and one of the great writers of his generation. This was my first year – I was just becoming a writer – and I thought, ‘Wow, I’d like to improve my style. What’s he like?’ He came out – and this was only a few years before he died - and he was in very bad shape, very heavy, perspiring. You know, right before you come on there’s a person stopping the perspiring and he was evidently perspiring. His head was lolling and over to the side. He didn’t seem good at all. I couldn’t reconcile that introduction with that person.

He talked quite bitterly about Tennessee Williams who had just died, sympathetically of Tennessee Wiliams but quite bitterly about the press and how cruel the press had been to him, and how America doesn’t appreciate its artists. I found him fascinating and appalling and strangely sympathetic. I felt protective of him in some way. I just remember very distinctly thinking, ‘What happened to you?’ If you’re this master stylist and this is what you seem like, something must have gone wrong. I started reading his work and started reading about him, and I came to feel that what went wrong went wrong in Kansas.”

Sympathizing with Capote: In order to get into character, Jones found it necessary to sympathize with Truman Capote. “I suppose with melodrama you don’t have to sympathize with the character, but I suppose in something like this it’s very hard acting a character where you’re having to retrace these decisions that he makes without in some way sympathizing with him. It seems to me he’s faced in this story with kind of almost a mythic problem, which is the masterpiece that he so clearly wants to write, that he’s driven to write. He knows enough about himself as a writer to know that the best ending for that is the thing that will kill the thing that seems to be on the brink of giving his life some meaning, or a new meaning. That tradeoff seems to me to be a terrible, terrible, and slightly unavoidable problem for him. It’s very easy to feel sympathy for that kind of dilemma.

Just to play a character like that, you have to look at all the contradictions within their life, within anyone’s life, to begin to feel sympathy for them. As you see, he was portrayed often as a clown. He’s often laughed at and laughed about when he appeared on the shows. As an actor, you’re looking for chinks in the persona and I found him remarkably easy to find, actually. Once I started examining his writing and examining the writing about him, I found this whole idea – this very composed person with witty putdowns and the costume and the voice and the whole very ‘done’ personality highly unconvincing. I think it’s jeopardized in our film. Our film’s about the jeopardy that mask is put under. You can see it crack because he attempts to not be sympathetic to someone.”

Jones’ Initial Reaction to the Script: “Just delight, proper excitement, mixed with terror,” recalls Jones. “He was so remote from me in so many ways. That sense of not really understanding his cultural significance in the same way that they do [in America], obviously. There is that sense of a huge job that I was about to undertake, which is also terrifying. Also as soon as he opens his mouth on film you go, ‘Oh God, what is that? What is that voice all about?’ And obviously as an actor your instinct is that this is a very performed personality, a very composite person. He very carefully studied certain things to appear a certain way. Obviously with this amazing script that read like a thriller and was about the breakdown of that mask, I was just very aware of a long uphill struggle that is exactly what you want as an actor. The thrill of transforming is the basic instinct of the actor.”

On the Set of Infamous: Sandra Bullock claims she never met the real Toby Jones until filming had wrapped. Jones thanked her for that compliment and said it was because he kept the voice going all day long. “I devised this warm up with the voice coach to get my voice in the right place. It would take me about an hour and a half every morning to get it so that the voice wasn’t in control of me, and that I was in control of the voice and I could use it properly. It was maybe just laziness but I decided that once I’d done that hour and a half, I wasn’t going to go back into this [normal] voice once I got into the Capote voice, as it were. I think that this created some confusion on the set that I might actually be being Truman 24 hours a day, which I wouldn’t wish on anyone (laughing).

And speaking of Sandra Bullock, Jones had nothing but praise for Bullock who plays his closest companion, Nelle Harper Lee (the author of To Kill a Mockingbird), in Infamous.

“It was amazing to work with someone who is such an, obviously, global star and wears that incredibly lightly. It sort of appropriate again to Harper Lee, because it’s such a surprise to see her playing someone who seems very self-contained and who has this immense strength through doing very little. Not very many people know that those amazing speeches that she delivers straight to camera, which I think are some of my favorite moments in the film, they’re very emotional, and they’re done very, very simply by someone who really knows about how little you need to do to generate a lot of emotion at that point in the story, and she did them on the first morning of the shoot. People characterize actors as being certain kinds of actors, and I think that was the extraordinary thing, to watch her come in and deliver those speeches – without that much direction. She came in very clear and very prepared. I think they’re very, very emotional – those speeches.”

The Research Process: Jones did an incredible amount of research to prepare for the role. “I became sort of neurotic about preparation. What else would he do? How did he smell? But there were scenes where I had to write in his hand, I spent some time just writing. It’s such a responsibility to play someone who’s so well-known. You find yourself if you’re dawdling in your hotel room with nothing else to do, ‘Have I done everything I can possibly do?’ I’d get the handwriting out and sort of doodle and try and get the spacing right. There’s something nice about it. It sounds lunatic and neurotic but it gives you the feeling that it’s in some way or somewhere retreading something that might be useful.”

Getting the Story Just Right:
Asked what was the most difficult part of the whole process, writer/director McGrath responded, “The thing that took the most work and the most thought was the relationship between Truman and Perry [Smith, played by Daniel Craig]. We only knew a few things, really. We knew that Dick [Hickock, played by Lee Pace] talked to Truman right away and that Perry didn’t. We knew that Perry would let him into his cell and then say, ‘I don’t want to talk to you.’ And we know that eventually he talked to him. I had to figure out how to get from there to there.

The script – I hate to use this term because it’s so false – but it had practically written itself up to that point. I grew up in Texas and I’ve lived in New York for 25 years so I knew how both would feel. I felt I knew how Kansas would feel if someone like Truman came, and then the reverse. I knew what it was like to want to drink some Scotch with a twist and a half of lemon and a splash of this. I knew all that culture, too. That part of the film was really fun to write. But then when Perry came, it was a bit of detective work and a bit of psychological work. I would think, ‘Well, why did he let him in only to tell him that he didn’t want to talk to him? He must have wanted to talk to him but there must have been some reason he couldn’t talk to him.’ Then it would be day after day after day thinking what that could be. So, then I thought, ‘Well, he’s afraid he’ll laugh at him,’ because he looks like a little peacock coming into the room and there’s Perry who looks…not like a peacock. I just had to work it through piece by piece by piece. For me, that was the hardest but I will say ultimately the most gratifying because it has to fit in with everything else and make sense with everything else.”

Comparing Capotes: Obviously Bennett Miller’s Capote beat Infamous into theaters – and nabbed an Oscar for leading man Philip Seymour Hoffman. Jones however has never seen the other Capote film. “I haven’t seen it. I feel like I’ve seen it. I haven’t seen it for the simple reason that I knew I’d be asked to compare it. I feel slightly that I’m never a very good judge of my own work anyway, so I just knew that that would happen.”

Источник

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неповторимый голос Крэйга  я рыдаю(очень маленький кусочек )

ЗДЕСЬ

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Через флэш-плеер записала с ДВД ,я рыдала

ЗДЕСЬ

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прослушала саунтреки к фильму но пока не нашла в е-муле .

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Тю я так старалась ,а никто и неотреагировал(может кто подскажет где взять на кинопоиске можно тока купить)

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Balula написал(а):

Тю я так старалась ,а никто и неотреагировал

молодец! гляну, позже. я вообще хочу сам фильм посмотреть, полностью...

Balula написал(а):

(может кто подскажет где взять на кинопоиске можно тока купить)

взять что?

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